Avina Joshi, PhD

Nominated From: University of Michigan

Research Site: University of Ghana

Research Area: Obstetrics & Gynecology

Primary Mentor: Cheryl Moyer

Research Project

The Patient Perspective on Preeclampsia and Eclampsia: An Analysis of Attitudes, Knowledge and Experiences of Postpartum Women in Ghana

Hypertensive disorders complicate 10% of pregnancies worldwide (1,2) and preeclampsia occurs in 2-8% of all pregnancies globally(1). In developing countries, hypertensive disorders account for 10-15% of maternal deaths (1,2). In Ghana, the incidence of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy has been estimated from a hospital based study as 7.6%(3). Eclampsia contributes significantly to maternal mortality in developing countries. In Ghana, a case fatality of 3.9% has been reported, and institutional reports from two major tertiary level hospitals suggest hypertensive disorders have overtaken haemorrhage as the leading cause of maternal mortality(3,4).

References:

1. Duley L. The Global Impact of Preeclampsia and Eclampsia. Semin Perinatol [Internet]. Elsevier Inc.; 2009;33(3):130–7. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.semperi.2009.02.010

2. WHO. WHO recommendations for prevention and treatment of preeclampsia and eclampsia. 2011;38.

3. Adu-Bonsaffoh K, Samuel OA, Binlinla G, Samuel OA. Maternal deaths attributable to hypertensive disorders in a tertiary hospital in Ghana. Int J Gynecol Obstet [Internet]. International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics; 2013;123(2):110–3. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijgo.2013.05.017

4. Acquaah-Arhin R, Kwawukume EY. Trend in Eclapmsia in Korle Bu Teaching Hospital Accra Accra Ghana. Vol. 6, Nigerian Journa of clinical practice. 2003. p. 1–4.

Research Significance

Despite a large amount of research on hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, limited focus has been placed on understanding the patient perspective. Little is known about attitudes, knowledge and experiences in women with pregnancies affected by Preeclampsia and Eclampsia. Gathering and analyzing this data can have key implications for addressing knowledge gaps, improving patient counseling, encouraging early prenatal visits and hospital deliveries for high risk women in subsequent pregnancies, and addressing implications for breastfeeding and infant bonding. Findings from this research will have key implications for developing educational interventions to address knowledge gaps, improving patient counseling, encouraging early prenatal visits and hospital deliveries for high risk women in subsequent pregnancies, and addressing implications for breastfeeding and infant bonding.

Publications

Get online and learn about the fellowship. Try and meet up with alumni and talk with them. Write a convincing research proposal and identify faculty affiliated with the fellowship to work with. Get recommendations from these faculties and use these to solicit support from the US-based partner universities. Use both these sets of recommendations and your proposal (which must have been thoroughly reviewed by these faculties) to apply for the fellowship. Hopefully you will get it. Don’t feel unqualified to apply for the fellowship, it is open to the most inexperienced, but most curious of budding scientists. You’re free to re-apply as much as possible for future calls for applications if you were previously unsuccessful- meanwhile keep developing your research profile to be on the cutting edge among the competition. This fellowship training may offer more than you may ever hope or imagine.

Publications

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Mentors

 

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